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20100915
20100915
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elements. that is why i'm here -- to give thanks and gratitude for all the work hard to get us here. i want to thank those just once again, the secretary, for his willingness to think differently and look differently at this project. this project was dead many many times, but it was because of his willingness to look at this in a new light and consider things that previous secretaries of the navy had not considered because of the great work of his staff and both the department of defense and because, more importantly, of the incredible commitment, not just passing interest, speaker ned to pelosi, who started this thing through three presidential administrations, secretaries of navy, mayors like me that come and go, members of the board of supervisors, treasure island development authority that stuck it out for all this time. to nancy pelosi, thank you yet again. what a remarkable effort. you deserve an enormous amount of credit. we thank you. we are proud of you. this is a big deal. on top of that, hunters point, which was a big deal. trans a terminal, doyle drive, the bay bridge. t
. and the problem was the building. we were in a building that had long outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who
not have something like that in their area. but i have also had the opportunity firsthand to use the program. i hired an individual that i needed a claims person. i was shorthanded, and i did not have the wherewithal to hire somebody, and i hired this incredible woman who has come in, and i will continue to employ her, but just to give you a story, this literally happened just this week. on monday at 3:00 a.m., she had a child. at 11:00, she called my office and said she would be in tomorrow. we told her that that was not necessary. [laughter] but it shows the dedication, and i am also pleased to say we are providing full benefits, so she has her sick leave and medical, but she has done so much for my company. one of the things that is not talked about on this program, obviously, is the benefit to the employer. it is a benefit to the individual, but the other benefit is to employees that work for us. i have a statement from the claims manager in my office, and her comment was hiring someone who is participating in the jobs now program has enabled him to once again provide custome
. climate change is upon us. it is happening fast. those of us who live in coastal areas will fill the affect of that first. we want to recognize the mayor's leadership in not just the opportunity of building such an important structure -- this is the first leed certified hospital in the state of california, and what that means is the rebuilding of the entire campus is to provide respect, dignity, and validation for all of the residents who will be here at laguna honda, but next importantly that we build something that will come from its conception, enhance the conservation of the water is an energy used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if we let governor h
're in a special use district of any kind or redevelopment area of any kind? >> i don't believe we developed there anymore. >> because the thing that comes up for me commissioners, is -- is the underserved nature of the location. the fact that it doesn't have grocery stores convenient grocery stores, that it does not have convenient. i -- i mean -- >> can i make a correction to that. it does. saveway is right in the area. >> three blocks. >> three blocks away. >> because -- for me public transportation, i mean i can just imagine what it is for an elder person relying on public transportation to take them back and for the across town and something that is within walking distance. >> that will be different, though, once the legislation is enacted in terms of -- of access to -- to a -- you know a pharmaceutical because -- if this legislation is enacted then saferway will no longer be able to sell pharmaceuticals. it would be back to a --, a walgreen's or a -- or a independent drugstore. >> okay, thank you. >> what about -- what about some kind of financial ceiling on gross receipts? like -- sto
this money. close to half are used -- youth, in fact. we started in may. we were one of the first on board. mayor newsom would go to the u.s. conference of mayors, and he would tell the we had this great program. my office kept getting calls. we have been talking to states and localities all over the country and really, due to the mayor's leadership, this 250,000 no. i think is largely attributed to that. robert miller, who is here, one of our early partners with jobs now, well over 150 employees -- 145 employees through jobs now. he will talk about that, but he will talk about this innovative online campaign he has got going to get this thing extended. robert miller. >> i'm director of veterinary archives, and i want to thank mayor newsom for having the fortitude, the foresight, and the temerity to stay with a program for the very beginning -- since the very beginning. he took a chance on main street. we want to take that chance on government. our first higher was in june 2009, and our last was yesterday, the last day before the door closed. we believe the program benefits both sides of m
-- information they had, that they sent this information out to help us understand that the permit plans for the deck did not list the ladder and that was posted as a garage extension. i said that was because when we went to building, i had to go back to taking pictures and they told me i could not take down the garges because they had allowed a loft lying window next door. since they improve that, i told them that had nothing to do with that. i kept bringing them pictures showing them what i would do. consequently i paid $350 for a permit. i wrote in and buys citation notice, the information that was apparently approved by this commission of regarding the supervisors' request to have them taken off because they could be dangerous because a child had hurt themselves. they had been there three times to talk to the commission about this. she was nice enough to send me the information about today's hearing. thank you. >> did you receive a notice of violation from our department? >> in the traditional inspection they had my building listed as a rooming house. i do not know why. it is not a r
of the u.s. conference of mayors. mayors from all over this great state have assembled here today to talk about the energy efficiency conservation block grant program. this is a program that started in 2007, and it delivers funds directly to cities to be able to improve their energy efficiency, reduce their carbon footprint, and as important, create new jobs in our community. i will just give you a little background in this really quickly. program was originally thought of in 2005 when the u.s. conference of mayors launched its climate protection agreement. the agreement is a landmark measure across the country. the u.s. conference of mayors initiated it. it began with 141 mayors. it now has 1044 mayors that have signed on to the climate protection agreement, committing to reduce our climate footprint in each one of our communities. the energy block grant program has been an integral part of that. it gives us the resources to reduce our energy consumption and reduce our carbon footprint, and as i said, it also creates jobs. it has been the result of a lot of people working together, but i
. we are no longer enrolling new employers. for us, we are at the status quo. we have a month left. we're working hard to get our folks ready for the transition. we hope to not have to do that, but we are preparing for pretty bad news. today, final push. the mayor will talk a little bit about the program as well. >> thanks, and thank you all very much for taking the time to be here. i actually just left senator feinstein, who has been a champion of this program. the reference that not to impress but to impress upon you that we need all the friends we can get all the champions we can get to extend this program. 3820 families are being served by this program. these are families, many of which -- close to, in fact, 1000 of these families were on welfare, and now pulled out of welfare and have the dignity of a paycheck and the dignity that comes with a paycheck. when they come back home to feed their family. that is not a rhetorical line. that is not a line just to place some politics. that is quite literal. this program, arguably, is the most successful stimulus program in the united stat
. >> there with us. we have two more speakers. a program that grew as quickly as this that we put on the ground very rapidly, the had the guts and tweaks and shortcomings along the way, but there needs to be support from a wide range of support across the community, and we have with us today a good leader. he is standing behind me. he was extremely helpful. i do not know if he thought he was being held or if my staff thought he was being helpful, but he was gracious enough to spend his time to send out e- mails, to call, to send out programs, and it really helped improve our processes, and it helped approved the ability for small businesses to take advantage of this program, so really appreciate that from myself and my staff. >> thank you. i was trying to be helpful, so i wanted to clarify that. i am also the founder of small business california new mexico on the board, and i have had the opportunity to speak to small businesses across the state and country about this phenomenal program. most of the businesses i talk to ask why they did not have something like that in their area. but i have also had
federal investigators this morning and joins you now -- and joins us now with this live report. >> reporter: good morning, tori. yes, it's been almost a week since this fireball and explosion and fire here in san bruno. there are still so many questions. the ntsb is out here this morning. we're getting more information about where this investigation is headed. key among the question is how did this start, obviously and why did it burn so long? let's talk about the cause. the ntsb has been asking for anyone to come forward if they smelled gas in the days leading up to the explosion. there have been about 90 e- mails sent to the ntsb. but the ntsb said they only had one person who smelled gas and that was two or three weeks before this happened. if they didn't smell gas, that would be a clue. >> if people smell gas in advance, that suggests a failure, where gas is coming out and people smell it. that's a different kind of failure than a catastrophic failure. that would help us determine the cause of this explosion. that's why that's so crucial to us. >> reporter: there's also the
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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